Systemlink answers many technical questions every day.

We list below some of those most frequently asked.

Please click on a question below to jump to the answer, or scroll down further to see all the answers.

1. How do I choose the correct manifold?
2. Which are the flow and return connections?
3. How can I connect a solid fuel boiler into my existing open-vented system?
4. How can I connect a solid fuel boiler into my existing Sealed system?
5. Do I need to install motorised valves with the manifold?
6. Is the SystemLink manifold a neutraliser?
7. Do I need a separate system by-pass?
8. Do you sell directly to the public?
9. What size manifolds are available?
10. Can I link two or more manifolds for extra capacity?
11. Can the manifold be turned upside down?
12. Are pumps included with the SystemLink? What size are they?
13. What is supplied as part of the SystemLink Zoning Centre?
14. What is the difference between a SystemLex and a MiniLex?
15. What is important to know about flow rates?

 

When you are finished here, you can... Continue_tour

 

Here are the questions again with the answers:

 

1. How do I choose the correct manifold?

There are two basic products to choose from: the SystemLink Zoning Centre or the SystemZone manifold. The SystemLink Zoning Centre contains the SystemZone manifold and SystemLex wiring centre mounted in a cabinet with pumps already attached and prewired, plus automatic air vent and safety valve. The SystemLink Zoning Centre is sold with 1-inch connections only; however the SystemZone manifold is sold in a variety of sizes with connections up to 2-inches..

SystemLink_unit_for_FAQSZD5_for_FAQ

To choose the correct manifold, two basic questions must first be answered:

  • How many heat sources?
  • How many zones? (Include both heating and domestic hot water.)

Add the answers to these questions together to find the number of sets of flow/return pairs that are required. For example, if there is 1 boiler and 4 zones (including DHW), 5 pairs of flow/returns are required - order a SystemZone 5 or a SystemLink 5. Note that the end connections may also be used for a zone.


If more than 6 flow/return pairs are required, two manifolds can be linked to provide the extra capacity. For example, if 7 pairs are required, a SystemZone 5 and a SystemZone 4 may be linked to provide this. However, because of the built-in bypass, a pump is necessary between the two manifolds to provide circulation.


Choose appropriately sized connections on the manifold based on the table below, which shows the rated heat capacity per zone in kW for various connection sizes:

SystemZone_sizes_for_FAQ

 


2. Which are the flow and return connections?

Standard_side_boiler_connection_SZD5_for_FAQ

Multiple_boiler_connections_SZD5_for_FAQ

Multiple_boilers_SZD5_mounted_below_boilers_for_FAQ

 


3. How can I connect a solid fuel boiler into my existing open-vented system?

The SystemLink manifold may be used to interconnect solid fuel boilers to oil or gas boiler systems as illustrated below.

The diagrams below show two common solid fuel configurations:

  • Four-pipe system
  • Two-pipe system

Any solid fuel boiler must be installed in accordance with the manufacturers instructions. The system will be an open vented system with a thermosyphon circuit from the solid fuel appliance.

 

Schematic of a four-pipe solid fuel system:

Solid_fuel_schematic_4-pipe_system_for_FAQ

 

Schematic of a two-pipe solid fuel system:

Solid_fuel_schematic_2-pipe_system_for_FAQ

 

It’s important to note that a SystemLex rather than a MiniLex should be used to control this system. Please consult the Schematics Database for wiring diagrams appropriate for your layout.

 

 

4. How can I connect a solid fuel boiler into my existing sealed system?

The SystemLink manifold may be used to interconnect solid fuel boilers to oil or gas boiler systems as illustrated below. It is very similar to an open-vented only system but you must install a Plate Heat Exchanger between the manifold and the solid fuel heat source

The diagrams below show two common solid fuel configurations:

  • Four-pipe system
  • Two-pipe system

Any solid fuel boiler must be installed in accordance with the manufacturers instructions. The system will be an open vented system with a thermosyphon circuit from the solid fuel appliance on one side of the heat exchanger and a sealed system on the other side of the heat exchanger.

 

Schematic of a four-pipe solid fuel system:

OB_SF_2Rads_DHW_HEx

 

Schematic of a two-pipe solid fuel system:

OB_SF_2Rads_DHW_HEx2

 

It’s important to note that a SystemLex rather than a MiniLex should be used to control this system. Please consult the Schematics Database for wiring diagrams appropriate for your layout.

 

 

5. Do I need to install motorised valves with the manifold?

No, the combination of the SystemLink manifold and pumps replaces motorised valves. However, simple non-return valves are recommended especially on any zones that are at a higher level than the SystemLink manifold.

 

 

6. Is the SystemLink manifold a neutraliser?

Yes, it is what’s known as a neutraliser or hydraulic separator but does more than the standard neutraliser. A standard neutraliser is effectively a sealed bucket that takes in flow and return water and lets them mix together freely whereas SystemLink manifolds have a baffle structure inside to separate the hot and cold water, this make for a far more efficient system.

 

 

7. Do I need a separate system by-pass?

No, there is a by-pass already built into all Systemlink manifolds.

 

 

8. Do you sell directly to the public?

No, Systemlink products are only available through heating and plumbing merchants.

 

 

9. What size manifolds are available?

SystemZone_sizes_for_FAQ

 


10. Can I link two or more manifolds for extra capacity?

Yes, this is easy, but there must be a pump installed between manifolds, otherwise circulation will not occur between them.

 

 

11. Can the manifold be turned upside down?

The SystemLink manifold is usually mounted with the zone flows and returns pointing downwards. If the SystemZone is being used to manifold multiple boilers, it can be used upside down - see the final diagram in question 2 above "Which are the flow and return connections?".

 

The SpiroZone manifold is more advanced than the systemlink and can be mounted in any orientation to facilitate installation in compact spaces.

 


12. Are pumps included with the SystemLink? What size are they?

Pumps are supplied with the SystemLink Zoning Centre, but not with the SystemZone manifold. The pumps are Grundfos 25/40.

 

 

13. What is supplied as part of the SystemLink Zoning Centre?

The SystemLink Zoning Centre consists of the SystemZone Manifold, SystemLex, Grundfos 25/40 Zone pumps and valves (prewired to SystemLex), safety valve and auto air vent, all mounted in a painted steel cabinet.

 


14. What is the difference between a SystemLex and a MiniLex?

The SystemLex is a 4-zone controller with auxiliary relay that can control 1,2 or 3 heat sources . Each Zone is individually fused. The MiniLex is a simple 3-zone controller with one overall fuse that can control 1 heat source.


15. What is important to know about flow rates?

 

Flow Considerations

To operate correctly, the flow into the manifold - the Primary Flow (from the primary heat source) - must at least equal the flow out of the manifold - the Secondary Flow (to the secondary heating or domestic hot water zones).

 

                     That is, Primary Flow must at least equal Secondary Flow.

 

The ideal condition is where the Primary Flow is equal to the Secondary Flow. In other words, all of the water being supplied in by the boiler is in turn being supplied out to the zones.

 

For the condition where Secondary Flow is less than Primary Flow, there is an excess of hot water being supplied by the boiler to the zones. This is an acceptable situation when the excess of water from the boiler flow travels through the bypass in the manifold to join the water flow returning back to the boiler. Most modern gas boilers will modulate their power output depending on the conditions.

 

The third possible situation is Primary Flow less than Secondary Flow. This is not a desirable situation as it means that the flow of water being supplied to the manifold by the boiler is less than the flow of water required by the heating zones. In this case the shortfall of water flow to the zone results in a flow of cooler zone return water travelling the wrong way through the bypass, thereby cooling the heating zone flow water. In this situation the primary heat source flow remains at high temperature but it is noticeable that the secondary heating zone flow is much cooler.

Continue_tour